Crime Prevention Program Recognized

Fairfax County Board of Supervisors recognizes the re-certification of the Crime Prevention Program for the Fairfax County Police Department.

Fairfax County Board of Supervisors recognizes the re-certification of the Crime Prevention Program for the Fairfax County Police Department.

Whether they are hosting self-defense seminars, helping Scouts earn honor badges, or packing food boxes for the hungry, local Crime Prevention Officers are making a difference in our community.

A certified crime prevention community.

A certified crime prevention community.

The Criminal Justice Services Board of the Virginia Department of Criminal Justice Services has, once again, approved and re-certified Fairfax County as a Crime Prevention Community, one of very few in the Commonwealth.

The Certified Crime Prevention Community Program was created in 1998 by a directive from the Governor’s Commission for Community Safety. It was designed to promote community safety and to recognize policies and practices used by safe, low-crime communities. Fairfax County sends a strong message that crime will not be tolerated and that officials make all reasonable efforts to eliminate it.

Core elements that are closely evaluated and analyzed by the Criminal Justice Services Board are: participation in a Crime Prevention Coalition, Crime Prevention Specialists, Neighborhood Watch, Community Policing, Safety Literature, Security Assessments Capability, Functional Crime Analysis, School Safety Audits, Business Outreach, Victim/Witness Program, Delinquency Prevention Programs, Accreditation, and other optional elements that show outstanding community/police engagement.

A few of examples of Crime Prevention programs designed to help prevent local crime are:

Citizen Advisory Committees (CAC), National Night Out (NNO), Neighborhood Watch (NW) and Road DAWG Camp.

  • CAC: Each of the police department’s eight district stations hosts a monthly CAC meeting, which is organized by the Crime Prevention Officer for that station. All residents are welcome to attend and to learn about public safety events and potential crime trends in their neighborhoods.
  • NNO: There were 143 NNO events held on the annual night in August last year, designed to bring out neighbors to get to know each other and get to know their local police officers. Events include picnics, pool parties, or popsicles and often include children and visits from McGruff, the Crime Dog character.
  • NW: Officers help empower and encourage residents to get involved by hosting and promoting Neighborhood Watch seminars; last year officers hosted 42 training sessions on topics such as conducting home safety surveys. There are roughly 650 NW groups in Fairfax County.
  • Road DAWG Camp: Crime Prevention Officers help orchestrate this program that is designed to empower pre-teens skills to resist joining gangs and experiment with drugs. The program targets at-risk youth and approximately 300 teens participate each year.

Learn more about the hard work it takes to be classified as a Certified Crime Prevention Community at http://www.dcjs.virginia.gov/cple/documents/crimepreventioncommunityreport2010.pdf.

National Night Out

National Night Out